12th Annual Dutch Oven Roundtable (With Recipes) Best Attended in Five Years

Alpine District Adult Scouters Sample Dutch Oven Dishes from Five Stakes

Alpine District Adult Scouters Sample Dutch Oven Dishes from Five Stakes

Good food brings out boys and Boy Scout Leaders to what many claim is an annual tradition that has gone on over twelve years (still trying to nail down when it started.)

Steve Shippen with his Coca-Cola Chicken (caffeine-free of course)

Steve Shippen with his Coca-Cola Chicken (caffeine-free of course… does caffeine cook off?)

June 14th at 7:15pm at the Highland Heritage Park was the annual Dutch Oven Roundtable for the Alpine District.

Five stakes brought three different Dutch Oven dishes to sample and over seventy leaders came to sample the fare and go home with recipes and a full stomach.

Scott Whiting from Highland East takes first bite of the evening

Scott Whiting from Highland East takes first bite of the evening

Highland West Stake brought Fresco Taco Soup, Sugar Bacon Cheatin’Chili, and Caramel Pudding Cake.

Another stake brought Pepper Chicken Chettinad, Baked Beans, and Yams, Apples, and Potatoes (a favorite of the night)

Larry Walker, a published author on three books about Dutch Oven Cooking, shared his BBQ Ribs and Coke Cake and demonstrated cooking on a Camp Chef when you can’t use charcoal (like all over Utah right now). His site is http://www.MyDutchOven.com.

Highland West Stake Sugar Bacon Cheatin' Chili

Highland West Stake Sugar Bacon Cheatin’ Chili

Sugar Bacon Cheatin’ Chili (award winning)

1 gallon Cattle Drive Gold Chili from Costco
1 cup bacon bit  crumbles
1/2 to 1 cup brown sugar (to taste)
12 inch Dutch Oven

Run late to any Dutch oven event… with your head held high. Discretely dump the chili, bacon, and brown sugar into Dutch Oven. Throw away the can without being caught. Simmer using bottom heat for about 30 minutes or until chili is hot. Serve with a smile. This recipe, invented in the 23rd Ward by a joyful scouter, was the preferred chili over a dozen made from scratch by ladies of the ward with mad shills. Shhhhhhhhhh!

John Heiner from Alpine North Stake Savoring the Dutch Oven Samples

John Heiner from Alpine North Stake Savoring the Dutch Oven Samples

Alpine North Stake’s John Heiner brought his fancy new multilayer Dutch Oven that allowed for three meatloaf tins with a selection of tasty vegetables underneath. You can’t forget the ketchup though.

John Heiners Fancy Multi-Layer Dutch Oven with Meatloaf Tins on rack over Tasty Vegetables

John Heiners Fancy Multi-Layer Dutch Oven with Meatloaf Tins on rack over Tasty Vegetables

 

Sharlene Skidmore brought a box oven she made many years ago by lining inside and out with tin foil, a duct-taped window made from a browning bag for a turkey, and shelves made from hangers.

Sharlene Skidmore's foil box oven cooks chocolate chip cookies over briquets

Sharlene Skidmore’s foil box oven cooks chocolate chip cookies over briquets

By using two pie tins inverted and on top of each other and 10-12 briquettes she has an oven that bakes at 350 degrees.

Justin Allen eating while Sharlene Skidmore tells About her Foil Box Oven

Justin Allen eating while Sharlene Skidmore tells About her foil box oven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She demonstrated baking a dozen chocolate chip cookies which disappeared very fast. She has baked muffins, cakes, rolls, etc. And the whole thing folds up thin and packs away easily.

Blackberry Raspberry Cobbler from Justin Allen of the Alpine North Stake

Blackberry Raspberry Cobbler from Justin Allen of the Alpine North Stake

Justin Allen demonstrates another use of tin foil, to avoid time consuming cleanup you line the entire Dutch Oven. You don’t get quite the same taste that Dutch Ovens are famous for, but you definitely save time at the back end of a meal.

Grant Miller Recognized for 60 Years of Service to Boy Scouts

by Ken Krogue, Alpine District Chairman

In the summer of 2011 I spent nearly a week at the bottom of the Grand Canyon at Havasupai Falls with Grant Miller. He and his grandson rode horses down and back, but only because his grandson had broken his leg. I think Grant would have out-hiked us all.

Grant Miller at the bottom of the Grand Canyon showing how he fixed his hiking boots

Grant Miller at the bottom of the Grand Canyon showing how he fixed his hiking boots

We thought his hiking came to an end when the heel of his hiking boots came off. No worries for Grant, he gingerly carved a notch in the heel with his trusty pocketknife, and re-routed his laces through the heel at just the right angle to keep his heel on for the rest of the trip… typical innovative Grant.

I first got to know Grant Miller years ago when I lived in Alpine and I needed some displays for a Court of Honor. I was the Scoutmaster. I went to his house and he took me into his garage where he had dozens and dozens of well organized scouting displays neatly tucked away and ready for use.

And better yet, he knew where everything was.

Along one wall were several handmade plywood kayaks that folded up. A few years ago he taught all the Scouts of Troop 858 how to make those same kayaks during the winter, and they took them to Strawberry Reservoir to try them out.

I got up early the other day to start exercising and joined Grant on his morning hike up to the top of Cemetery Hill in Alpine (he does four laps several days a week.)

On May 10th, 2012, Grant Miller was recognized at Roundtable for earning his 60 year pin

Grant Miller Recognized for 60 Years of Service in Scouting

Grant Miller Recognized for 60 Years of Service in Scouting

for continuous service in Scouting. Nearly two dozen people came in addition to the normal attendees to see him recognized.

I asked him to summarize his service:

“I have been active in scouting 60 years. Active in Scouts, Varsity, Exploring, as a boy and adult. I served as:

  • 11-year-old Leader,
  • Junior Assistant Scoutmaster,
  • Assistant Scoutmaster,
  • Scoutmaster,
  • Assistant Varsity Scout Leader,
  • Institutional Representative,
  • Chartered Organizational Representative,
  • Assistant District Commissioner,
  • Unit Commissioner,

In addition to all these positions in Scouting Grant also graduated from many higher levels of adult scout training as well as serving on staff to train others:

  • Graduate from Commissioner College,
  • BYU Merit Badge Pow-Wow Staff,
  • Boy Scout Roundtable Staff,
  • Varsity Scout Huddle Staff,
  • Wood Badge Trained and earned beads,
  • Completed Basic Training and
  • Served on Basic Training Staff several times.
  • Served on All Star staff (Varsity Scout boy leader training)
  • Completed seven 50 milers (backpacking, kayak, or canoe
  • Member of Stanford Oljato Lodge of Order of the Arrow
  • Attended many camporees and Klondike derbies in many councils.

Grant has received many awards over the years:

  • On My Honor Award
  • Duty to God Award
  • Scoutmaster Key
  • Commissioners Key
  • All four Varsity Scout Letters
  • The Old Spanish Trail Medallion
  • Silver Beaver Award
Grant Miller with Kris Heslop, one of his boy scouts of many years ago

Grant Miller with Kris Heslop, one of his boy scouts of many years ago

Grant had the distinction of being able to serve as Scoutmaster in a Spanish troop while in the army after learning Spanish on his mission. His army service took him all over and allowed him to serve in the following Boy Scout Councils:

  • National Capital Area Council – Washington D.C.
  • Yucca Council – Las Cruces, New Mexico
  • Alamo Council – San Antonio, Texas
  • Rio Grand Council – San Benito, Texas
  • Stanford Area Council – Sunnyvale, California
  • Great Salt Lake Council – Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Utah National Parks Council – Alpine, Utah

Any bets on a 70 year pin? I’ll put good money on Grant Miller.