Winter Camping resources

Here are some ideas to help simplify planning for your next winter campout. These were shared in the recent Varsity Huddle.

8 simple tips for a comfortable winter camp

  1. Preparation (mental and physical) for boys and adult leaders.
  2. Burn calories to stay warm—eat lots of calories.
  3. Closed-cell foam pad for sleeping, standing, sitting, etc.
  4. Hot water bottles at night in sleeping bag (Nalgene work best).
  5. Layer clothing – bring a complete change of clothing (especially with snow caves).
  6. Bring an extra sleeping bag, tarp, or blanket for extra warmth.
  7. Sleep with a Beanie.
  8. When building snow caves – take two days to build them.

Resources

Winter Camping - Scouting Magazine

Winter Camping – Scouting Magazine

Places to go

  • City Weekly article – Has information about Big Cottonwood Canyon, American Fork Canyon, Spanish Fork Canyon, Strawberry Reservoir, Mirror Lake Highway, East Canyon, Rockport State Park.
  • Utah National Parks Council – Maple Dell or Frandsen Scout Ranch. Overnight packages include activities, equipment and food.

Winter Camping Info

Activity ideas

  • Ice fishing
  • Hiking/Snow-shoeing
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Fire building competitions
  • Build a sled to haul gear
  • Shelter building – see link in Winter Camping Info section above for different types
  • Animal tracking
  • Lion hunting game (#4 at http://www.inquiry.net/outdoor/games/b-p/tracking.htm)
  • Snowshoe soccer
  • Fox and Geese
  • Track and Snow – set up a hurdles course using piles of snow. Can have contests for speed or height.
  • Biathlon
  • Hot springs near Fillmore

 

For more great ideas for your Team, attend the next Varsity Huddle!

Scouting Ceremonies

For the October Roundtable, we had an interesting presentation and discussion on Scouting ceremonies. We started off by reviewing the history and purpose of ceremonies and then looked at flag ceremonies, campfires, courts of honor, eagle courts, and other awards and ceremonies in more detail.  Resources for enhancing flag ceremonies, recitations of the Scout Oath and Law, and awarding rank advancements to Scouts were reviewed and handed out to attendees.

One important Scout Ceremony is the retiring of the US flag

One important Scout Ceremony is the retiring of the US flag

“Every Scout should be made to feel that he has taken an important forward step in his life when he receives an award or rank advancement.  He should be made to feel that added responsibility has fallen upon his shoulders because he has now become an example for the younger Scouts coming up through the ranks.”

“The primary function of ceremony is to organize the imagination, to emphasize fundamentals and to present in concrete form the abstract sense of idealism, which is inherent in the individual. Good ceremonials stimulate both thought and emotion, and provide a basis for an intelligent and sympathetic conception of one’s duty to God, his country, his neighbor and himself.” –  Raymond Hanson, Scout Executive, San Francisco

In addition to the discussion, we also enjoyed an interesting display of Scouting memorabilia (such as camp and event patches, eagle figurines and an official BSA bugle) and other items (a bear rug to put patches and awards on, campfire stories and handcrafted Scout camp totems) that can be used to enhance Scouting campfires and ceremonies.

Changing the image of Scouting

by Mike Pratt

Ever wondered how to get your boys more engaged with Scouting? Does it suffer from an image problem within your team?

Here are some ideas to get that spark going:

·         Keep the “outing” in “Scouting” – outdoor activities attract boys and get attendance.

·         Make it fun. It’s not all about passing things off.

·         Get them involved and running the program. Involvement leads to buy-in.

·         Do something big and worthwhile. Something they have to work towards to make happen.

·         Ask them to commit. One group got up at 6:30am a week after school was out to start prepping for their big adventure.

·         Help them see beyond the uniform to the things they do as Scouts—river trips, canyoneering, etc.

·         Try using a field uniform (T-shirt) they helped design for identity and esprit de corps.

·         Provide a list of gear they’ll need. Boys get excited about having gadgets.

·         Liken it to them. What do they want to be when they grow up? Help them understand how what they’re doing now leads to success later.

·         Do some marketing – promote the activities, be enthusiastic.

·         Find your own passion in Scouting. You can’t start a fire without heat.

For other ideas see Help Scouts change the perception that Scouting’s not ‘cool’ in the September–October issue of Scouting Magazine.

Find more ways to help your boys by attending roundtable, held at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. For Boy Scouts, including Venturing and Varsity, go to the LDS chapel at 10400 N. 6000 West. For Cub Scouts, go to the LDS chapel at 6400 W. Timpanogos Highway.

12th Annual Dutch Oven Roundtable (With Recipes) Best Attended in Five Years

Alpine District Adult Scouters Sample Dutch Oven Dishes from Five Stakes

Alpine District Adult Scouters Sample Dutch Oven Dishes from Five Stakes

Good food brings out boys and Boy Scout Leaders to what many claim is an annual tradition that has gone on over twelve years (still trying to nail down when it started.)

Steve Shippen with his Coca-Cola Chicken (caffeine-free of course)

Steve Shippen with his Coca-Cola Chicken (caffeine-free of course… does caffeine cook off?)

June 14th at 7:15pm at the Highland Heritage Park was the annual Dutch Oven Roundtable for the Alpine District.

Five stakes brought three different Dutch Oven dishes to sample and over seventy leaders came to sample the fare and go home with recipes and a full stomach.

Scott Whiting from Highland East takes first bite of the evening

Scott Whiting from Highland East takes first bite of the evening

Highland West Stake brought Fresco Taco Soup, Sugar Bacon Cheatin’Chili, and Caramel Pudding Cake.

Another stake brought Pepper Chicken Chettinad, Baked Beans, and Yams, Apples, and Potatoes (a favorite of the night)

Larry Walker, a published author on three books about Dutch Oven Cooking, shared his BBQ Ribs and Coke Cake and demonstrated cooking on a Camp Chef when you can’t use charcoal (like all over Utah right now). His site is http://www.MyDutchOven.com.

Highland West Stake Sugar Bacon Cheatin' Chili

Highland West Stake Sugar Bacon Cheatin’ Chili

Sugar Bacon Cheatin’ Chili (award winning)

1 gallon Cattle Drive Gold Chili from Costco
1 cup bacon bit  crumbles
1/2 to 1 cup brown sugar (to taste)
12 inch Dutch Oven

Run late to any Dutch oven event… with your head held high. Discretely dump the chili, bacon, and brown sugar into Dutch Oven. Throw away the can without being caught. Simmer using bottom heat for about 30 minutes or until chili is hot. Serve with a smile. This recipe, invented in the 23rd Ward by a joyful scouter, was the preferred chili over a dozen made from scratch by ladies of the ward with mad shills. Shhhhhhhhhh!

John Heiner from Alpine North Stake Savoring the Dutch Oven Samples

John Heiner from Alpine North Stake Savoring the Dutch Oven Samples

Alpine North Stake’s John Heiner brought his fancy new multilayer Dutch Oven that allowed for three meatloaf tins with a selection of tasty vegetables underneath. You can’t forget the ketchup though.

John Heiners Fancy Multi-Layer Dutch Oven with Meatloaf Tins on rack over Tasty Vegetables

John Heiners Fancy Multi-Layer Dutch Oven with Meatloaf Tins on rack over Tasty Vegetables

 

Sharlene Skidmore brought a box oven she made many years ago by lining inside and out with tin foil, a duct-taped window made from a browning bag for a turkey, and shelves made from hangers.

Sharlene Skidmore's foil box oven cooks chocolate chip cookies over briquets

Sharlene Skidmore’s foil box oven cooks chocolate chip cookies over briquets

By using two pie tins inverted and on top of each other and 10-12 briquettes she has an oven that bakes at 350 degrees.

Justin Allen eating while Sharlene Skidmore tells About her Foil Box Oven

Justin Allen eating while Sharlene Skidmore tells About her foil box oven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She demonstrated baking a dozen chocolate chip cookies which disappeared very fast. She has baked muffins, cakes, rolls, etc. And the whole thing folds up thin and packs away easily.

Blackberry Raspberry Cobbler from Justin Allen of the Alpine North Stake

Blackberry Raspberry Cobbler from Justin Allen of the Alpine North Stake

Justin Allen demonstrates another use of tin foil, to avoid time consuming cleanup you line the entire Dutch Oven. You don’t get quite the same taste that Dutch Ovens are famous for, but you definitely save time at the back end of a meal.